Certificate Courses

Conflict Resolution Skills

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Price: $500.00
Avg. Completion Time: 7 hours

Tired of arguing? Try some of the effective communication techniques offered in this certificate.  You’ll also gain insight into what forgiveness really means and how sometimes, it can be okay to feel angry.

In this certificate course, you’ll learn:

  • Effective communication tools that you can use at home and at work
  • Appropriate and effective ways to express anger
  • The difference between genuine forgiveness and pseudo-forgiveness
  • and much more!

 

Certificate Program Description

This course is designed to equip the learner not only with effective conflict resolution skills but also with an overview of the deeper and often more difficult work of forgiveness and reconciliation from a Catholic/Christian perspective integrated with the best practices in the behavioral sciences.

By the end of this certificate program, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the different principles of effective communication.

  2. Explain the importance of listening and using empathy when communicating

  3. Explain common ways in which anger is mismanaged

  4. Identify effective tools to both express and manage anger

  5. Describe the difference between forgiveness and “pseudo-forgiveness”

  6. Identify tools for promoting forgiveness

  7. Explain the difference between anger and hatred

  8. Identify some common reasons people like interpersonal hatred

  9. Identify the long-term consequences of interpersonal hatred

  10. Discuss psychological obstacles, such as pride, to overcoming interpersonal hatred through forgiveness

 

Sequence of Certificate Program Webinars

Conflict Resolution in Marriages, Families and Communities by Greg Kolodziejczak, Ph.D., Psy.D. (1 hr 15 min)

All marital relationships will inevitably have conflict.  The biggest difference between those marriages who survive and those which end in divorce is the ability to communicate constructively.  Dr. Kolodziejczak presents just how a couple can communicate constructively by explaining the principles of communication.  Dr. Kolodziejczak will also explain the important role that listening and using empathy can play in fostering healthy relationships.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the different principles of communication
  2. Identify the importance of listening in fostering a healthy relationship
  3. Explain the importance of using empathy when communicating

Re-discovering Righteous Anger: Be Angry But Do Not Sin by Ian Butler, LMHP (1hr 23 min)

The proper understanding of the importance of righteous anger has been largely lost to modern Western culture.  This has led to patterns of breakdown within the culture, within communities, within marriages and families and can lead to alternating passive and aggressive extremes of expression (e.g., suppression, depression, passive/aggression and explosive aggression). This webinar will emphasize the proper understanding of anger as well as cover healthy ways to express anger and effective tools for managing anger.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify current trends within Western culture that inhibit a healthy expression of anger
  2. Explain common ways in which anger is mismanaged
  3. Discuss principles drawn from the writings of Aristotle on utilizing the gift of anger properly
  4. Identify effective tools to both express and manage anger

 

Inner Healing, Forgiveness, and Reconciliation by Ian Butler, LMHP (1 hr 15 min)

In this workshop, Ian Butler, LMHP, provides an in-depth examination of forgiveness and the psychological healing it can bring.  He draws upon the seminal work by Robert Enright, Ph.D. and Richard Fitzgibbons, M.D. to define forgiveness and describe the process.  Butler provides helpful tools that can be used when undertaking forgiveness work as well as practical solutions to some of the common roadblocks to forgiveness.  This workshop is 1 hour and 9 minutes long.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the difference between forgiveness and “pseudo-forgiveness”.
  2. Identify tools for promoting forgiveness.

Interpersonal Hatred and Other Barriers to Forgiveness by Paul C. Vitz, Ph.D. (1 hr 26 min)

Interpersonal hatred is a common obstacle to personal growth and human flourishing, especially when a client has been deeply hurt by another. And although the application of forgiveness as a therapeutic intervention can be very helpful, it must never be required or merely forced on a client, who must be allowed time and assistance in letting go of his or her hatred. This workshop will explain the origin of interpersonal hatred, why people like and hold onto it, and its long-term consequences. It will also offer some practical applications for helping a client overcome hatred.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the difference between anger and hatred
  2. Discuss the origin of interpersonal hatred
  3. Identify some common reasons people like interpersonal hatred
  4. Identify the long-term consequences of interpersonal hatred
  5. Discuss psychological obstacles, such as pride, to overcoming interpersonal hatred through forgiveness

Instructor Biographies

Ian Butler, LMHP, M.A., M.T.S.

Ian Butler, LMHP, M.A., M.T.S. is a Catholic clinician who has worked since 1999 as a counselor for Catholic Social Services with the Diocese of Lincoln, Nebraska, a clinical site specializing in the integration of the truths of the Catholic faith with Psychology. He has a Masters in Counseling from Franciscan University with a concentration in Christian Counseling, as well as a Masters in Theological Studies from Ave Maria University’s Institute for Pastoral Theology.

Since 2006, Ian has increasingly focused his clinical work toward providing professional counseling services by telephone to Catholics around the world, many of whom are unable to find faithful Catholic counseling in their area. He is the Executive Director of Holy Family Counseling Services and is currently developing an apostolate to work specifically with priests and seminarians: St. John Vianney Counseling Services. Since 2007, he has been a faculty member for the Institute for Priestly Formation, a summer seminary in Omaha, Nebraska, that currently draws 175 seminarians annually for a 10 week program focusing on deepening the prayer life of seminarians and removing or healing obstacles to healthy prayer and ministry. Since 2011, he has assisted in the human formation of aspirants for the diaconate program of the Archdiocese of Omaha. He is married and has three children.

Greg Kolodziejczak, Ph.D., Psy.D.

Greg Kolodziejczak, Ph.D., Psy.D. works primarily in private practice in Harvard Square in Cambridge, MA.  In addition, he is involved with the Archdiocese of Boston, working with the diocese’s marriage preparation curriculum committee.  Dr. Kolodziejczak previously received a Ph.D. in Ocean Engineering from MIT and a Masters in Theology from Catholic University. After enrolling in the Institute for Psychological Sciences, where he received a Masters and Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology, he then accepted an APA-approved internship at the Danielsen Institute in Boston.  He completed his postdoc at Two Brattle Center in Cambridge, a clinic that specializes in utilizing psychodynamic approaches and Dialectical Behavior Therapy in working with patients with severe levels of distress.  He currently works with Two Brattle Center and in private practice in Cambridge.  His almost-800 page dissertation was a synthesis of psychology, philosophy, and theology on the issue of love.  In January 2008, he was chosen to present on a case at the American Psychoanalytic Conference in New York, with Peter Fonagy and Otto Kernberg, both giants in psychology.

Paul C. Vitz, Ph.D.

Paul C. Vitz, Ph.D. focuses his teaching and research on the integration of Christian theology, especially Catholic anthropology, with psychology. This requires breaking from the modern secularism and post-modern relativism prevalent today. He is presently focused on the following special topics: The Psychology of Hatred and Forgiveness; The Psychology of the Virtues; The Psychological Importance of Fathers; and the Positive Relevance of Psychology for the Priesthood. Dr. Vitz’s books include: Psychology as Religion: The Cult of Self-Worship; Sigmund Freud’s Christian Unconscious; Modern Art and Modern Science: The Parallel Analysis of Vision; Faith of the Fatherless: The Psychology of Atheism; and The Self: Beyond the Post-modern Crisis. He was Professor of Psychology at New York University for many years prior to joining the faculty at the Institute for the Psychological Sciences.

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